Collaborative Research: On Making Wave Energy an Economical and Reliable Power Source for Ocean Measurement Applications

National Science Foundation

Work Plan:
Task 1: Wave-by-wave control and Multi-resonant control
(a-i) Wave-by-Wave Control: Generalize to conversion from relative oscillation in surge, heave, and pitch modes. This step places high expectations on geometry design, because the chosen geometry needs to maximize wave radiation (radiation damping) by relative oscillation in all three modes. Typically, for small axi-symmetric buoys, radiation damping in surge and pitch modes is considerably smaller than that in heave mode. Therefore, greater oscillation excursions are typically required for optimal conversion in these modes. In addition, the power requirements of the wave measurement hardware also need to be included in the daily/annual powver calculations. For the X-band Radar hardware applicable to the up-wave distances of interest to us (on the order of 1000 m), the power consumption is expected to be less than 300 W (average). This could pose a challenge in some wave conditions, but it is likely that the use of multiple modes and optimized geometries will help to provide sufficient usable power for the iFCB application we are pursuing in this work. We plan to extend the current simulations to address these needs.
(a-ii) Geometry Design: New geometry design/utilization approaches to maximize the radiation damping for the 3 relative oscillation modes are being considered. These will be evaluated through detailed simulations in the forthcoming period.
(b) Multi-resonant Control: Current implementations need to be extended to incorporate realistic oscillation constraints. Further extensions to 2-body systems with power capture from relative oscillation are also required, and are planned for the forthcoming period. Finally, the procedure also needs to be extended to investigate multiple-mode conversion (i.e. relative heave, pitch, and surge oscillations).
Task 2: Actuator Design and Energy Storage
Work is planned for the forthcoming period where propose to examine favorably interacting buoy-instrument cage geometries that will minimize the need for large amounts of reactive power to flow through the system. Particular attention will be given to hydrodynamic and mechanical coupling effects and ways to provide negative stiffness through geometry design.
In addition, non-polluting high-lubricity hydraulic fluids will be evaluated through actuator dynamic models over the frequency range of interest.
Task 3: Simulation of Complete System and Wave Tank Testing
This is an important part of the project. The complete system will be simulated following inclusion of multiple-mode relative oscillation conversion and more detailed actuator design. Besides the power requirements of the wave measurement system, all other non-function-critical power needs embedded within the overall system (on-board electronics, etc.) will be included in this simulation.
Wave tank tests are planned as part of this project. Preparations are currently underway to install a wave tank (with flap type absorbing wave makers) capable of providing accurate and repeatable sea states for this project. 1/2 or 1/5 scale models are planned.

Investigator: Umesh Korde