Microgrid Modeling and Optimization for High Penetration Renewables Integration

Sandia National Laboratory

Abstract
Future microgrids are envisioned having a large renewable energy penetration. While this feature is attractive it also produces design and control challenges that are currently unsolved. To help solve this dilemma, development of analysis methods for design and control of microgrids with high renewable penetration is the general focus of this activity. The specific foci are (1) reduced order microgrid modeling and (2) optimization strategies to facilitate improved design and control. This will be investigated over a multi-year process that will include simplified microgrid modeling and control, single microgrid modeling and control, collective microgrid modeling and control, and microgrid (single and collective) testing and validation.

Microgrid Reduced Order Modeling (ROM)
Model development is one of the first steps in the microgrid control design process and incurs trade-offs between fidelity and computational expense. Models used for model-based control implementation must be real-time while having sufficient accuracy so that feedforward information can be maximized to achieve specified requirements. The expected outcomes of this study are (1) quantification of model uncertainty as a function of the assumptions with particular interest given to reduced order models (2) determination of appropriate time scales for reduced order modeling and (3) a MATLAB / Simulink reduced order model library of microgrid components. Contrasting different microgrid reduced order modeling approaches and simulation results that demonstrate the reduced order microgrid simulation.

Microgrid Optimization
Demonstrating microgrids with robust and high renewable penetration requires system-level extremization. This includes both its physical and control system designs. The expected outcomes of this study are (1) energy-optimal design methods suitable for microgrid design and control and (2) integration of these strategies with the microgrid reduced order model environment described above. How energy-optimal design can be exploited for microgrid design and control.

Investigators: Gordon Parker, Wayne Weaver